Keeping the “Black Dog” at bay.

Posted: April 29, 2015 · By: Dave Elton · Comments: 0
Under: Loop walks, News, Tips, Training, Walks
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Between one thing and another the page has been neglected for over a month. From a behind the scenes point of view we are planning our next move, but that’s just a poor excuse. From my own point of view I’ve had other things happening and have lost a bit of the momentum from earlier in the year.

With the now annual “Cycle against Suicide” setting off from Belfast recently and due in Tralee this Sunday, I felt it was a good opportunity to touch on the subject of depression and how cycling, walking, running and other sports help to keep it at bay.

I woke this morning feeling a bit down. Through one thing or another the momentum I’d built up in February had been eroded, the weather is back to how it was in January, things aren’t going quite as I’d like and a set back feels like a disaster.

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I could hear the mythical “Black Dog” howling in the distance, time for some action. This is a position I’ve been in for a good bit of my life, with varying degrees of seriousness. Thankfully the last 10 years have been kind. I think I’m at the stage now were I can spot the signs and try to do something about it.

Sadly many people start getting that “down” feeling and allow it to take over. So it’s easy to spend too many hours in the bed, sitting on the couch, gazing at rubbish tv programmes, aimlessly surfing the net and filling yourself full of junk food and sweet drinks. In fairness it’s a formula that makes you feel even worse.

Even though your mind is willing you to stay in your “comfort zone” the way forward is to challenge those thoughts and get yourself out there. I guess many people reading this know what a great feeling it is to do a walk or a cycle, you rarely regret it!

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For myself it was a case of getting out to do a familiar loop around Tralee which lasted for about 2 hours and was just over 10 km. Taking in the local countryside, the seaside, the canal and a small village. We are really quite lucky here in Kerry.

So the message I’m trying to get across in all this is that we all do get down from time to time, but it doesn’t have to be like that. Spot the signs, get out there and do something. Don’t let the Black Dog Bite!

 

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